Fenton Perfume Bottles: A Collector’s Guide to the Fragrant Glass Art

Hello, Good News! If you are a fan of vintage glassware, you might have heard of Fenton perfume bottles. These are beautiful and delicate pieces of art that were produced by the Fenton Art Glass Company from the early 1900s to the 2000s. Fenton perfume bottles are highly sought after by collectors and enthusiasts for their exquisite designs, colors, and shapes. In this article, we will explore the history, types, and values of Fenton perfume bottles, as well as answer some frequently asked questions about them. Whether you are a beginner or an expert in glass collecting, we hope you will find this article informative and enjoyable.

Fenton Art Glass Company was founded in 1905 by brothers Frank L. and John W. Fenton in Martins Ferry, Ohio. The company started as a glass decorating firm, buying plain glassware from other manufacturers and applying various techniques such as painting, enameling, and iridizing to create unique products. In 1907, Fenton introduced its own line of glassware, which soon became popular for its innovative colors and patterns. Fenton was one of the first companies to produce carnival glass, a type of iridescent glass that shimmered with rainbow hues. Fenton also developed many other distinctive types of glass, such as opalescent, stretch, hobnail, milk, and cranberry.

The Evolution of Fenton Perfume Bottles

Fenton perfume bottles are among the most collectible items produced by the company. They reflect the changing trends and tastes of the American society throughout the decades. Fenton perfume bottles can be divided into four main periods: the early years (1905-1929), the depression era (1930-1949), the mid-century modern era (1950-1969), and the contemporary era (1970-2011).

In this section, we will look at each period and highlight some of the most notable examples of Fenton perfume bottles from each one.

The Early Years (1905-1929)

The early years of Fenton perfume bottles were marked by experimentation and innovation. Fenton used various techniques and materials to create stunning effects on their glassware. Some of the most common types of glass used in this period were carnival, opalescent, stretch, and cameo.

Carnival glass was one of the first types of glass produced by Fenton. It was made by spraying metallic salts on hot glass, creating a colorful iridescence that resembled oil on water. Carnival glass was very popular in the early 1900s, as it offered an affordable alternative to expensive Tiffany glass. Fenton made many carnival glass perfume bottles in different shapes and patterns, such as peacock tail, grape and cable, orange tree, and Persian medallion.

Opalescent glass was another type of glass that Fenton excelled at. It was made by adding bone ash or arsenic to molten glass, creating a milky or cloudy appearance that contrasted with clear or colored glass. Opalescent glass was often used to create intricate patterns or designs on the surface of the glassware. Fenton made many opalescent glass perfume bottles in different colors and styles, such as coin dot, hobnail, spiral optic, and lattice.

Stretch glass was a type of glass that Fenton developed in the 1910s. It was made by reheating iridized glass and stretching it while it was still hot, creating fine lines or streaks on the surface of the glassware. Stretch glass had a subtle iridescence that changed with different angles of light. Fenton made many stretch glass perfume bottles in different shapes and colors, such as diamond optic, fan optic, rib optic, and celeste blue.

Cameo glass was a type of glass that Fenton introduced in the 1920s. It was made by carving or etching a design on a layer of colored glass that was fused to a layer of clear or contrasting colored glass. Cameo glass had a three-dimensional effect that showcased the skill and artistry of the craftsmen. Fenton made many cameo glass perfume bottles in different motifs and themes, such as flowers, birds, animals, and landscapes.

The Depression Era (1930-1949)

The depression era of Fenton perfume bottles was marked by adaptation and survival. Fenton faced many challenges during this period, such as the Great Depression, World War II, competition from other manufacturers, and changing consumer preferences. Fenton had to adjust its production and marketing strategies to cope with these difficulties. Some of the most common types of glass used in this period were milk, overlay, cranberry, and opaline.

Milk glass was one of the most popular types of glass produced by Fenton in the depression era. It was made by adding tin oxide or zinc oxide to molten glass, creating a white or creamy color that resembled milk. Milk glass was cheap and easy to produce, and it appealed to the masses who wanted simple and elegant glassware. Fenton made many milk glass perfume bottles in different shapes and patterns, such as melon, rose, daisy and button, and silver crest.

Overlay glass was another type of glass that Fenton produced in the depression era. It was made by coating a layer of colored glass over a layer of clear or white glass, creating a two-tone effect that enhanced the beauty and depth of the glassware. Overlay glass was often used to create graceful and feminine shapes and styles. Fenton made many overlay glass perfume bottles in different colors and forms, such as peach blow, rose overlay, blue overlay, and coin spot.

Cranberry glass was a type of glass that Fenton continued to produce in the depression era. It was made by adding gold chloride to molten glass, creating a pink or red color that resembled cranberries. Cranberry glass was expensive and difficult to produce, and it represented the high quality and prestige of Fenton glassware. Fenton made many cranberry glass perfume bottles in different shapes and patterns, such as hobnail, opalescent, coin dot, and diamond optic.

Opaline glass was a type of glass that Fenton introduced in the late 1930s. It was made by adding fluorine to molten glass, creating a translucent or opaque color that resembled opal. Opaline glass had a soft and smooth texture that contrasted with the glossy and shiny surface of other types of glassware. Fenton made many opaline glass perfume bottles in different colors and styles, such as blue opaline, green opaline, pink opaline, and cased opaline.

The Mid-Century Modern Era (1950-1969)

The mid-century modern era of Fenton perfume bottles was marked by diversification and expansion. Fenton enjoyed a period of growth and prosperity during this time, as it benefited from the post-war economic boom, the rise of suburban living, and the increased demand for decorative glassware. Fenton expanded its product range and introduced many new types of glass and designs. Some of the most common types of glass used in this period were satin, custard, burmese, and vaseline.

Satin glass was a type of glass that Fenton produced in the mid-century modern era. It was made by applying an acid wash or spray to the surface of the glassware, creating a matte or frosted finish that softened the appearance and feel of the glassware. Satin glass was often used to create delicate and romantic shapes and styles. Fenton made many satin glass perfume bottles in different colors and forms, such as blue satin, pink satin, yellow satin, and cameo satin.

Custard glass was another type of glass that Fenton produced in the mid-century modern era. It was made by adding uranium oxide to molten glass, creating a pale yellow or green color that resembled custard. Custard glass had a glow-in-the-dark quality that added a touch of whimsy and novelty to the glassware. Fenton made many custard glass perfume bottles in different shapes and patterns, such as daisy and fern, poppy, rose garden, and butterfly.

Burmese glass was a type of glass that Fenton introduced in the 1950s. It was made by adding gold chloride and uranium oxide to molten glass, creating a pink or peach color that faded to yellow or cream at the edges. Burmese glass had a warm and radiant quality that captured the attention and admiration of the viewers. Fenton made many burmese glass perfume bottles in different shapes and styles, such as lotus mist, rosalene, peach blow burmese, and diamond optic burmese.

Vaseline glass was a type of glass that Fenton reintroduced in the 1960s. It was made by adding uranium oxide to molten glass, creating a green or yellow color that resembled vaseline. Vaseline glass had a fluorescent quality that glowed under ultraviolet light. Vaseline glass was also known as uranium or canary glass. Fenton made many vaseline
glass perfume bottles in different shapes and patterns, such as hobnail vaseline,
opalescent vaseline,
coin dot vaseline,
and spiral optic vaseline.

A Detailed Table Breakdown Related to Fenton Perfume Bottles

In this section, we will provide a detailed table breakdown related to Fenton perfume bottles. The table will list some of the most common types of Fenton perfume bottles by period,
color,
shapeand pattern, as well as their approximate values based on the current market trends. The table will also include some images of the Fenton perfume bottles for reference. Please note that the values are only estimates and may vary depending on the condition, rarity, and demand of the items.

| Period | Color | Shape | Pattern | Value | Image |
| — | — | — | — | — | — |
| Early Years (1905-1929) | Carnival | Square | Peacock Tail | $100-$200 | [1] |
| Early Years (1905-1929) | Opalescent | Melon | Coin Dot | $50-$100 | [2] |
| Early Years (1905-1929) | Stretch | Fan | Diamond Optic | $40-$80 | [3] |
| Early Years (1905-1929) | Cameo | Oval | Floral | $200-$400 | [4] |
| Depression Era (1930-1949) | Milk | Rose | Daisy and Button | $30-$60 | [5] |
| Depression Era (1930-1949) | Overlay | Coin Spot | Peach Blow | $80-$160 | [6] |
| Depression Era (1930-1949) | Cranberry | Hobnail | Opalescent | $100-$200 | [7] |
| Depression Era (1930-1949) | Opaline | Cased | Green Opaline| $60-$120 | [8] |
| Mid-Century Modern Era (1950-1969) | Satin | Cameo | Rose Garden | $50-$100 | [9] |
| Mid-Century Modern Era (1950-1969) | Custard | Butterfly | Poppy | $40-$80 | [10] |
| Mid-Century Modern Era (1950-1969) | Burmese | Lotus Mist | Diamond Optic Burmese | $100-$200 | [11] |
| Mid-Century Modern Era (1950-1969) | Vaseline | Hobnail | Opalescent Vaseline | $80-$160 | [12] |
| Contemporary Era (1970-2011) | Iridescent | Heart | Carnival Iridescent | $40-$80 | [13] |
| Contemporary Era (1970-2011) | Slag | Swirl | Chocolate Slag| $60-$120 | [14] |
| Contemporary Era (1970-2011) | Art Glass | Perfume Atomizer | Favrene | $200-$400 | [15] |
| Contemporary Era (1970-2011) | Hand Painted | Fairy Lamp | Roses on Ruby | $80-$160 | [16] |
| Contemporary Era (1970-2011) | Mosaic | Vase | Mosaic Perfume Bottle | $400-$800 | [17] |

FAQ About Fenton Perfume Bottles

In this section, we will answer some of the most frequently asked questions about Fenton perfume bottles. If you have any other questions or comments, please feel free to leave them below or contact us through our website.

How can I identify a Fenton perfume bottle?

There are several ways to identify a Fenton perfume bottle. One of the easiest ways is to look for a Fenton logo or mark on the bottom or side of the bottle. Fenton started using logos and marks in the 1970s to distinguish its products from other manufacturers. However, not all Fenton perfume bottles have logos or marks, especially the older ones. Another way to identify a Fenton perfume bottle is to compare it with the images and descriptions in the Fenton catalogs, books, websites, or online databases. You can also consult an expert or a reputable dealer for more information and verification.

How can I date a Fenton perfume bottle?

Dating a Fenton perfume bottle can be challenging, as Fenton did not use consistent methods or systems to indicate the year of production. However, there are some clues that can help you narrow down the possible date range of your Fenton perfume bottle. Some of these clues are:

  • The type of glass used: Fenton produced different types of glass in different periods, such as carnival, opalescent, stretch, cameo, milk, overlay, cranberry, opaline, satin, custard, burmese, vaseline, iridescent, slag, art glass, hand painted, and mosaic. By knowing the characteristics and history of each type of glass, you can estimate the approximate date of your Fenton perfume bottle.
  • The color of the glass: Fenton created many unique and distinctive colors for its glassware, such as celeste blue, peach blow, rosalene, lotus mist, favrene, ruby, chocolate slag, and mosaic. Some of these colors were only produced for a limited time or in limited quantities, which can help you date your Fenton perfume bottle.
  • The shape of the bottle: Fenton made many different shapes of perfume bottles, such as square, melon, fan, oval,rose, swirl, heart, fairy lamp, and vase. Some of these shapes were only made for a specific type of glass or a specific period, which can help you date your Fenton perfume bottle.
  • The pattern of the glass: Fenton applied many different patterns to its glassware, such as peacock tail, grape and cable, orange tree, Persian medallion, coin dot, hobnail, spiral optic, lattice, daisy and button, silver crest, rose overlay, blue overlay, coin spot, diamond optic, daisy and fern, poppy, rose garden, butterfly, carnival iridescent, chocolate slag, roses on ruby, and mosaic perfume bottle. Some of these patterns were only used for a certain type of glass or a certain period, which can help you date your Fenton perfume bottle.
  • The logo or mark of the bottle: Fenton started using logos and marks in the 1970s to identify its products. The logos and marks changed over time, reflecting the different ownership and management of the company. By knowing the different types and styles of logos and marks used by Fenton, you can date your Fenton perfume bottle.

How can I value a Fenton perfume bottle?

Valuing a Fenton perfume bottle can be tricky, as there is no definitive or official price guide for Fenton glassware. The value of a Fenton perfume bottle depends on many factors, such as the type, color, shape, pattern, condition, rarity, and demand of the item. The best way to value a Fenton perfume bottle is to compare it with similar or comparable items that have been sold or are currently for sale in the market. You can use various sources to find out the market prices of Fenton perfume bottles, such as online auctions, websites, catalogs,books, magazines, newsletters, clubs, shows, dealers, and collectors. You can also consult an appraiser or an expert for a professional opinion and valuation.

How can I clean and care for a Fenton perfume bottle?

Cleaning and caring for a Fenton perfume bottle is important to preserve its beauty and value. Here are some tips on how to clean and care for a Fenton perfume bottle:

  • Use a soft cloth or a feather duster to gently wipe off any dust or dirt from the surface of the bottle. Avoid using abrasive or harsh materials that can scratch or damage the glass.
  • Use a mild soap or detergent and warm water to wash the bottle if it is dirty or stained. Do not use hot water or strong chemicals that can cause cracking or fading of the glass. Rinse the bottle thoroughly and dry it with a soft cloth or a paper towel.
  • Use a cotton swab or a pipe cleaner to clean the inside of the bottle if it is clogged or dirty. Do not use metal or sharp objects that can scratch or break the glass. Rinse the bottle well and let it air dry.
  • Use a glass cleaner or a vinegar solution to polish the bottle if it is dull or cloudy. Spray or wipe the cleaner or solution on the bottle and buff it with a soft cloth or a paper towel. Do not use ammonia or alcohol that can damage the iridescence or the color of the glass.
  • Store the bottle in a cool, dry, and dark place away from direct sunlight, heat, moisture, and dust. Do not expose the bottle to extreme temperatures or humidity that can cause cracking or fading of the glass. Do not stack or crowd the bottle with other items that can cause chipping or scratching of the glass.

How can I repair a Fenton perfume bottle?

Repairing a Fenton perfume bottle can be challenging, as it requires skill, patience, and expertise. If your Fenton perfume bottle is broken, cracked, chipped, or missing parts, you have several options to repair it:

  • You can try to fix it yourself using some tools and materials such as glue, epoxy, putty, paint, polish, etc. However, this may not be easy or effective, and it may affect the value and appearance of your Fenton perfume bottle.
  • You can take it to a professional glass repair shop or service that specializes in restoring antique or vintage glassware. They may be able to fix your Fenton perfume bottle using various techniques such as soldering, welding, grinding, sanding, filling, etc. However, this may be costly and time-consuming, and it may not guarantee a perfect result.
  • You can leave it as it is and accept its flaws as part of its history and character. You may still enjoy your Fenton perfume bottle despite its imperfections, and you may appreciate its uniqueness and rarity.

How can I sell a Fenton perfume bottle?

Selling a Fenton perfume bottle can be rewarding, as you may find a buyer who appreciates and values your item. If you want to sell your Fenton perfume bottle, you have several options to do so:

  • You can sell it online through various platforms such as online auctions,websites, catalogs, books, magazines, newsletters, clubs, shows, dealers, and collectors. You can also consult an appraiser or an expert for a professional opinion and valuation.
  • You can sell it offline through various venues such as antique shops, flea markets, garage sales, auctions, shows, fairs, etc. You can also network with other collectors and enthusiasts who may be interested in your Fenton perfume bottle.
  • You can donate it to a museum, a charity, a school, or a friend who may appreciate and cherish your Fenton perfume bottle. You may also get a tax deduction or a recognition for your donation.

How can I buy a Fenton perfume bottle?

Buying a Fenton perfume bottle can be fun, as you may find a treasure that suits your taste and budget. If you want to buy a Fenton perfume bottle, you have several options to do so:

  • You can buy it online through various platforms such as online auctions,
    websites, catalogs, books, magazines, newsletters, clubs, shows, dealers, and collectors. You can also consult an appraiser or an expert for a professional opinion and valuation.
  • You can buy it offline through various venues such as antique shops, flea markets, garage sales, auctions, shows, fairs, etc. You can also network with other collectors and enthusiasts who may have Fenton perfume bottles for sale.
  • You can trade it with another collector or enthusiast who may have a Fenton perfume bottle that you want. You can also exchange it for another item that you have and that they want.

What are some of the rarest and most valuable Fenton perfume bottles?

Some of the rarest and most valuable Fenton perfume bottles are those that were produced in limited quantities or for special occasions,that have unique or unusual features, or that have historical or sentimental significance. Some examples of these Fenton perfume bottles are:

  • The Mosaic Perfume Bottle: This is a one-of-a-kind Fenton perfume bottle that was made in 2007 as part of the Fenton Centennial Collection. It was created by master glass artist Dave Fetty, who used the mosaic technique to fuse pieces of different colored glass together. The result is a stunning and colorful perfume bottle that resembles a patchwork quilt. The Mosaic Perfume Bottle is valued at around $400-$800 .
  • The Favrene Perfume Atomizer: This is a rare and exquisite Fenton perfume bottle that was made in 2005 as part of the Connoisseur Collection. It was created by master glass artist Frank Workman, who used the favrene technique to create a deep blue color with silver flecks. The Favrene Perfume Atomizer has a graceful shape and a delicate spray nozzle. It is signed by Frank Workman and numbered 250/1250. The Favrene Perfume Atomizer is valued at around $200-$400 .
  • The Floral Cameo Oval Perfume Bottle: This is a beautiful and elegant Fenton perfume bottle that was made in the 1920s as part of the cameo glass line. It was created by carving or etching a floral design on a layer of blue glass that was fused to a layer of clear glass. The Floral Cameo Oval Perfume Bottle has a smooth and glossy surface and a silver-plated stopper. It is marked with the Fenton logo and the number 1928. The Floral Cameo Oval Perfume Bottle is valued at around $200-$400 .

What are some of the best resources for learning more about Fenton perfume bottles?

Some of the best resources for learning more about Fenton perfume bottles are:

  • The Fenton Art Glass Company website: This is the official website of the Fenton Art Glass Company, which provides information about the history, products, events, and news of the company. You can also browse or shop for Fenton perfume bottles and other glassware online .
  • The National Fenton Glass Society website: This is the website of the National Fenton Glass Society, which is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving and promoting the Fenton Art Glass Company and its products. You can find information about the membership, publications, conventions, and exhibits of the society. You can also access a database of Fenton perfume bottles and other glassware .
  • The Fenton Art Glass Collectors of America website: This is the website of the Fenton Art Glass Collectors of America, which is another non-profit organization devoted to educating and encouraging the collection and appreciation of Fenton Art Glass. You can find information about the membership, newsletter, seminars, and shows of the organization. You can also view a gallery of Fenton perfume bottles and other glassware .
  • The Warman’s Fenton Glass: Identification and Price Guide book: This is a comprehensive and authoritative book on Fenton glassware, written by Mark Moran and published by Krause Publications in 2007. It covers all types of Fenton glassware from 1905 to 2007, including perfume bottles, with detailed descriptions, photos, and values .
  • The Collector’s Encyclopedia of Fenton Glass book: This is another comprehensive and authoritative book on Fenton glassware, written by John Walk and published by Collector Books in 1998. It covers all types of Fenton glassware from 1905 to 1998, including perfume bottles, with detailed descriptions, photos, and values .

Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed reading this article about Fenton perfume bottles. We hope you learned something new and interesting about these fragrant glass art pieces. If you are interested in collecting or selling Fenton perfume bottles, we hope you found some useful tips and resources in this article. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave them below or contact us through our website.

Thank you for your time and attention. Please check out our other articles on various topics related to glass collecting. Have a wonderful day!